Portrait de l'artiste sous les traits d'un moqueur Framed Print

Liberty Maniacs

Joseph Ducreux's masterpiece. Not in the Louvre, but in your home.

This timeless gem was made in the midst of a boring, French neoclassical period during the French Revolution where artists scrambled to be relevant as their primary customer base, the aristocracy, was destroyed in one terror after another. While Duxcreux's buddies like Jacques-Louis David were sucking up to the politicians with their dry, mostly delusionally heroic depictions of revolutionaries screwing everything up, the elder portrait painter gave not a shit anymore. He plied his craft as a royal servant. He had already lived under the soul-sucking strictures of the monarchy and wasn't impressed with the rabble running the show now. In fact, his last commission was literally Louis XVI before the monarch's head was guillotined. 

Given the context of the painting, and painter as the portrait artist of the King, Ducreux's self-portrait openly mocks the viewer, the portrait, and himself all in one fourth-wall-destroying mannerism that throws convention to the wind. Its irreverence makes it one of the greatest oddities in Western fine art. It also makes it simply bad ass.

Made from high-quality museum grade paper, with a partly glossy, partly matte finish.

• Alder, semi-hardwood frame
• Black color
• .75” thick
• Acrylite front protector
• Hanging hardware included




Related Items