On the Southern Plains Frederic Remington Throw Pillow

Liberty Maniacs

One of Remington’s favorite themes was the American soldier in the West, of whom he wrote, “His heroism is called duty, and it probably is.” Here, soldiers led by a scout in buckskin charge an unseen enemy. Although the painting was probably meant to refer to the war against the Plains Indians in the 1860s—Remington titled it "Cavalry in Sixties"—the uniforms and weapons date variously from the time of the Civil War through the 1870s. The artist was willing to depart from reality in other details as well. For example, the horses and riders are shown as a dynamic mass rather than in a straight horizontal line, which was the usual attack formation.

Want to add a splash of color to your home? This premium feel pillow with a shape-retaining insert is just what you're looking for! It'll make any room luxurious and provide the perfect excuse for a quick power nap.

• 100% pre-shrunk polyester case
• Fabric with a linen feel
• Hidden zipper
• Machine-washable case
• Shape-retaining 100% polyester insert included (handwash only)

Title: On the Southern Plains
Artist: Frederic Remington (American, Canton, New York 1861–1909 Ridgefield, Connecticut)
Date: 1907
Culture: American
Medium: Oil on canvas
Original Dimensions: Very large. 30 1/8 x 51 1/8 in. (76.5 x 129.9cm)

From the Metropolitan Museum of Art Collection





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